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Why do plants have mitochondria?

Question:

Why do plants have mitochondria?

Overview of Mitochondria

Mitochondria is an organelle that is found in eukaryotic organisms. The purpose of mitochondria is to produce adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which is a form of energy released during a part of cellular respiration known as the Krebs cycle.

Answer and Explanation: 1

Plants contain mitochondria because they require this organelle to provide energy and fuel for their basic cell functions. Plants obtain energy through a process called photosynthesis, which takes place in the chloroplasts of the cell and produces glucose. The chloroplasts in the cells cannot break apart the glucose in order to release energy; instead, this process (the Krebs cycle) takes place in the mitochondria.


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What Is Mitochondria? - Definition & Functions

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Chapter 3 / Lesson 8
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Learn the definition of mitochondria and understand their different functions. Discover mitochondria's structure and parts with a diagram and see their location.


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