Which Roman emperor made Christianity the official religion of Rome?

Question:

Which Roman emperor made Christianity the official religion of Rome?

Roman Religion Before Christianity:

Religion in Rome before it adopted Christianity was polytheistic and involved every aspect of the Roman culture. Rulers were often priests and pontiffs, and acted as a voice to the people when declaring the will of the gods. Followers worshiped numerous gods, and the list expanded over time as other religions and cults were subsumed in what later Christians pejoratively called paganism. After the death of Christ and the rise of Christianity, the Romans outlawed the new religion and severely persecuted the members of the early Christian church.

Answer and Explanation:

Theodosius the Great was Emperor of Rome from 379 AD to 395 AD, and he made Christianity the official religion of Rome. Prior to his rule, Constantine the Great, Emperor from 306 AD to 337 AD, had a personal conversion to Christianity, but did not make it the official religion. After his conversion, he outlawed the persecution of Christians ending three hundred years of oppression and extreme mistreatment of the followers of Christ.

Theodosius became Emperor 42 years after Constantine, and he soon issued a decree that made Nicene Christianity the official religion of Rome. He also dissolved the order of the Vestal Virgins and banned many of the pagan rituals that were part of the Olympics. However, he did not outlaw the practice of paganism but he did ban certain sacrificial practices he felt were an anathema to the Christian faith.


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