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What process causes seaweed/macroalgae to degrade in water that has too much salinity or not...

Question:

What process causes seaweed/macroalgae to degrade in water that has too much salinity or not enough salinity?

Salinity:

Salinity is a measure of the inorganic salt concentrations in the water. The salinity level determines the osmotic pressure and affects the absorption of water and nutrients by seaweed or macroalgae.

Answer and Explanation: 1

When in water that has too much salinity, that is, hypertonic with respect to the salinity within cells, seaweed algae will shrivel and degrade due to loss of water. On the other hand, when the salinity of the surrounding water is not enough, that is hypotonic, the seaweeds will absorb excess water and thus burst or degrade. This is due to the process of water moving from an area of low salinity to an area of high salinity.


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Osmoregulation: Definition, Challenges & Energetics

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Chapter 44 / Lesson 1
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Discover what osmoregulation is and see a definition. Compare osmoregulators and osmoconformers and understand energetics and osmoregulation in fishes and humans.


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