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What phase difference, between two otherwise identical traveling waves, moving in the same...

Question:

What phase difference, between two otherwise identical traveling waves, moving in the same direction along a stretched string, will result in the combined wave, having an amplitude 1.7 times that of the common amplitude of the two combining waves? Express your answer in (a) degrees, (b) radians, and (c) as a fraction of the wavelength.

Superposition of Waves:

When two waves that are in phase travelling towards each other, at a certain point when they cross each other, the resultant amplitude of the wave will just be the sum of the individual amplitude of the waves. When they are not in phase, some trigonometric techniques are needed to determine the amplitude of the resultant wave.

Answer and Explanation: 1

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Consider the first wave to have the displacement of:

{eq}y_1 =y_m\sin{(kx-wt)} {/eq}

The second wave will have a displacement of:

{eq}y_2 =y_m...

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The Resultant Amplitude of Two Superposed Waves

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Chapter 16 / Lesson 10
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When two energy waves superpose (i.e. run into each other), the amplitudes change as a result. Learn more about energy waves in everyday life, how they interact, and the meaning of constructive vs. destructive interference.


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